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How does college tuition affect child support?

| Dec 8, 2020 | Family Law

For many Missouri parents, child support payments don’t end when your child reaches adulthood. In fact, you might find yourself paying for some of their college expenses as part of your child support obligations. Since the law was written with the assumption that a divorce shouldn’t affect a child’s ability to go to college, you might be responsible for paying for their tuition.

Does college tuition affect your child support payments?

Some states don’t require divorced parents to pay their child’s tuition. However, if you live in a state that requires it, you should be prepared to continue paying child support after your child reaches adulthood. The child support payments could help your child pay for tuition, books, room and board, and other college-related expenses.

The court will look at several factors when figuring out your child support payment. They might consider you and your former spouse’s financial situation, as well as any financial aid that the child might have received. They might also consider the financial situation that your child will probably be in if the divorce had never happened. Finally, the court might consider the cost of your child’s college expenses like tuition, books, transportation and more.

Once your child enters college, your payments will likely continue until the child earns a degree. This because your child isn’t considered to be emancipated until they can finally start living independently. At this point, you might want to consult an family law attorney so you can request that the court terminate your child support obligations.

How can an attorney help you with child support issues?

Your attorney could help you figure out how much child support you’ll owe throughout the payment timeline. Counsel may also assist you in determining whether you’ll still owe child support when your child turns eighteen. If you’re having trouble making your monthly payments, your attorney could help you request a child support modification to reduce your financial obligation.